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Katahdin
There are a few “must see” spots in Maine and Baxter State Park is definitely at the top of the list. Our weekend family trip was to overnight Friday at Roaring Brook, try to see some moose at nearby Sandy Stream Pond, then hike up to Chimney Pond and stay in the bunkhouse Saturday then hike out to Roaring Brook Sunday. Just a quick trip and a first for our kids.
The Park’s reservation system is now on a rolling 4 month system with online services now available (AMAZING, as it used to be snail mail only. Really). I made these reservations in February, and Chimney Pond just opened for summer overnight hikers the day we were there, June 1. 
I reserved the bunkhouse at Roaring Brook and Chimney Pond as I thought it may be cold and/or lots of black flies. Amazingly, it turned out steamy hot with a very healthy black fly population. 
Sandy Stream Pond did not disappoint. Many moose and our friends had a nice up close encounter with a cow and yearling. The kids swam in the pond with a grand view of the mountain behind them.
Saturday we hiked up to Chimney Pond, which is only 3.3 miles but feels about double that short mileage. Very rocky and steep in places. Katahdin miles are not normal hiking miles, they are LONG. We took our time and took a few water/food breaks. It took us 3 hours to hike from Roaring Brook to Chimney Pond.
The view up from Chimney Pond is amazing. With binoculars we could see hikers on the Knife Edge Trail between Chimney Peak and South Peak hunched over and getting on all fours at times. The wind was very strong at Chimney Pond, it must have been whipping furiously at the top of the mountain. Wanting to check out the wind gusts myself, I thought I’d run/hike up the Saddle Trail.
I put on my New Balance 1010 trail shoes and my Nathan running pack with food/water/jacket and trotted out of Chimney Pond and quickly it got way too steep to run. So power hiked it and ran where I could. I just couldn’t figure out why I wasn’t running into hikers coming down off the mountain making their loop back to Roaring Brook. Then I hit snow in a slide area. Snow carved out underneath by melt and rain flow. And no footprints. SO, maybe this trail is closed. It was a short section that I could skirt in some bushes, which I did, then the trail just went straight up. Like I hope to see-my-kids-again steep. I could see the top, maybe two tenths of a mile away so I just kept going knowing it was going to be scary descending. (And folks, the Saddle Trail is the “easy” way up from Chimney Pond to the top of the mountain. I remember it being much easier when I was 24 also.)
I got to the top and it was windy but not horrible. I did have a bit of tableland ahead of me so probably not full force, still I wouldn’t have wanted to be on the exposed Knife Edge or other peaks that day. I looked around a bit then headed straight back down the Saddle Trail.
Steep, scary, and requiring getting very low and using my hands, I slowly went down the steep part, which included a huge swarm of black flies. Pretty funny actually as I couldn’t swat at them it was so steep. I got back to the snow slide area and I just bushwhacked it again then hit the trail. Eventually I got down far enough to trot back into Chimney Pond campground. About 50 minutes and only 1.9 miles. My NB 1010 shoes were super grippy and performed well with a light pack on. I ran into the campground ranger later and heard him telling campers that all trails up the mountain from Chimney Pond are closed. Oopsy.
Zoom Info
Katahdin
There are a few “must see” spots in Maine and Baxter State Park is definitely at the top of the list. Our weekend family trip was to overnight Friday at Roaring Brook, try to see some moose at nearby Sandy Stream Pond, then hike up to Chimney Pond and stay in the bunkhouse Saturday then hike out to Roaring Brook Sunday. Just a quick trip and a first for our kids.
The Park’s reservation system is now on a rolling 4 month system with online services now available (AMAZING, as it used to be snail mail only. Really). I made these reservations in February, and Chimney Pond just opened for summer overnight hikers the day we were there, June 1. 
I reserved the bunkhouse at Roaring Brook and Chimney Pond as I thought it may be cold and/or lots of black flies. Amazingly, it turned out steamy hot with a very healthy black fly population. 
Sandy Stream Pond did not disappoint. Many moose and our friends had a nice up close encounter with a cow and yearling. The kids swam in the pond with a grand view of the mountain behind them.
Saturday we hiked up to Chimney Pond, which is only 3.3 miles but feels about double that short mileage. Very rocky and steep in places. Katahdin miles are not normal hiking miles, they are LONG. We took our time and took a few water/food breaks. It took us 3 hours to hike from Roaring Brook to Chimney Pond.
The view up from Chimney Pond is amazing. With binoculars we could see hikers on the Knife Edge Trail between Chimney Peak and South Peak hunched over and getting on all fours at times. The wind was very strong at Chimney Pond, it must have been whipping furiously at the top of the mountain. Wanting to check out the wind gusts myself, I thought I’d run/hike up the Saddle Trail.
I put on my New Balance 1010 trail shoes and my Nathan running pack with food/water/jacket and trotted out of Chimney Pond and quickly it got way too steep to run. So power hiked it and ran where I could. I just couldn’t figure out why I wasn’t running into hikers coming down off the mountain making their loop back to Roaring Brook. Then I hit snow in a slide area. Snow carved out underneath by melt and rain flow. And no footprints. SO, maybe this trail is closed. It was a short section that I could skirt in some bushes, which I did, then the trail just went straight up. Like I hope to see-my-kids-again steep. I could see the top, maybe two tenths of a mile away so I just kept going knowing it was going to be scary descending. (And folks, the Saddle Trail is the “easy” way up from Chimney Pond to the top of the mountain. I remember it being much easier when I was 24 also.)
I got to the top and it was windy but not horrible. I did have a bit of tableland ahead of me so probably not full force, still I wouldn’t have wanted to be on the exposed Knife Edge or other peaks that day. I looked around a bit then headed straight back down the Saddle Trail.
Steep, scary, and requiring getting very low and using my hands, I slowly went down the steep part, which included a huge swarm of black flies. Pretty funny actually as I couldn’t swat at them it was so steep. I got back to the snow slide area and I just bushwhacked it again then hit the trail. Eventually I got down far enough to trot back into Chimney Pond campground. About 50 minutes and only 1.9 miles. My NB 1010 shoes were super grippy and performed well with a light pack on. I ran into the campground ranger later and heard him telling campers that all trails up the mountain from Chimney Pond are closed. Oopsy.
Zoom Info
Katahdin
There are a few “must see” spots in Maine and Baxter State Park is definitely at the top of the list. Our weekend family trip was to overnight Friday at Roaring Brook, try to see some moose at nearby Sandy Stream Pond, then hike up to Chimney Pond and stay in the bunkhouse Saturday then hike out to Roaring Brook Sunday. Just a quick trip and a first for our kids.
The Park’s reservation system is now on a rolling 4 month system with online services now available (AMAZING, as it used to be snail mail only. Really). I made these reservations in February, and Chimney Pond just opened for summer overnight hikers the day we were there, June 1. 
I reserved the bunkhouse at Roaring Brook and Chimney Pond as I thought it may be cold and/or lots of black flies. Amazingly, it turned out steamy hot with a very healthy black fly population. 
Sandy Stream Pond did not disappoint. Many moose and our friends had a nice up close encounter with a cow and yearling. The kids swam in the pond with a grand view of the mountain behind them.
Saturday we hiked up to Chimney Pond, which is only 3.3 miles but feels about double that short mileage. Very rocky and steep in places. Katahdin miles are not normal hiking miles, they are LONG. We took our time and took a few water/food breaks. It took us 3 hours to hike from Roaring Brook to Chimney Pond.
The view up from Chimney Pond is amazing. With binoculars we could see hikers on the Knife Edge Trail between Chimney Peak and South Peak hunched over and getting on all fours at times. The wind was very strong at Chimney Pond, it must have been whipping furiously at the top of the mountain. Wanting to check out the wind gusts myself, I thought I’d run/hike up the Saddle Trail.
I put on my New Balance 1010 trail shoes and my Nathan running pack with food/water/jacket and trotted out of Chimney Pond and quickly it got way too steep to run. So power hiked it and ran where I could. I just couldn’t figure out why I wasn’t running into hikers coming down off the mountain making their loop back to Roaring Brook. Then I hit snow in a slide area. Snow carved out underneath by melt and rain flow. And no footprints. SO, maybe this trail is closed. It was a short section that I could skirt in some bushes, which I did, then the trail just went straight up. Like I hope to see-my-kids-again steep. I could see the top, maybe two tenths of a mile away so I just kept going knowing it was going to be scary descending. (And folks, the Saddle Trail is the “easy” way up from Chimney Pond to the top of the mountain. I remember it being much easier when I was 24 also.)
I got to the top and it was windy but not horrible. I did have a bit of tableland ahead of me so probably not full force, still I wouldn’t have wanted to be on the exposed Knife Edge or other peaks that day. I looked around a bit then headed straight back down the Saddle Trail.
Steep, scary, and requiring getting very low and using my hands, I slowly went down the steep part, which included a huge swarm of black flies. Pretty funny actually as I couldn’t swat at them it was so steep. I got back to the snow slide area and I just bushwhacked it again then hit the trail. Eventually I got down far enough to trot back into Chimney Pond campground. About 50 minutes and only 1.9 miles. My NB 1010 shoes were super grippy and performed well with a light pack on. I ran into the campground ranger later and heard him telling campers that all trails up the mountain from Chimney Pond are closed. Oopsy.
Zoom Info
Katahdin
There are a few “must see” spots in Maine and Baxter State Park is definitely at the top of the list. Our weekend family trip was to overnight Friday at Roaring Brook, try to see some moose at nearby Sandy Stream Pond, then hike up to Chimney Pond and stay in the bunkhouse Saturday then hike out to Roaring Brook Sunday. Just a quick trip and a first for our kids.
The Park’s reservation system is now on a rolling 4 month system with online services now available (AMAZING, as it used to be snail mail only. Really). I made these reservations in February, and Chimney Pond just opened for summer overnight hikers the day we were there, June 1. 
I reserved the bunkhouse at Roaring Brook and Chimney Pond as I thought it may be cold and/or lots of black flies. Amazingly, it turned out steamy hot with a very healthy black fly population. 
Sandy Stream Pond did not disappoint. Many moose and our friends had a nice up close encounter with a cow and yearling. The kids swam in the pond with a grand view of the mountain behind them.
Saturday we hiked up to Chimney Pond, which is only 3.3 miles but feels about double that short mileage. Very rocky and steep in places. Katahdin miles are not normal hiking miles, they are LONG. We took our time and took a few water/food breaks. It took us 3 hours to hike from Roaring Brook to Chimney Pond.
The view up from Chimney Pond is amazing. With binoculars we could see hikers on the Knife Edge Trail between Chimney Peak and South Peak hunched over and getting on all fours at times. The wind was very strong at Chimney Pond, it must have been whipping furiously at the top of the mountain. Wanting to check out the wind gusts myself, I thought I’d run/hike up the Saddle Trail.
I put on my New Balance 1010 trail shoes and my Nathan running pack with food/water/jacket and trotted out of Chimney Pond and quickly it got way too steep to run. So power hiked it and ran where I could. I just couldn’t figure out why I wasn’t running into hikers coming down off the mountain making their loop back to Roaring Brook. Then I hit snow in a slide area. Snow carved out underneath by melt and rain flow. And no footprints. SO, maybe this trail is closed. It was a short section that I could skirt in some bushes, which I did, then the trail just went straight up. Like I hope to see-my-kids-again steep. I could see the top, maybe two tenths of a mile away so I just kept going knowing it was going to be scary descending. (And folks, the Saddle Trail is the “easy” way up from Chimney Pond to the top of the mountain. I remember it being much easier when I was 24 also.)
I got to the top and it was windy but not horrible. I did have a bit of tableland ahead of me so probably not full force, still I wouldn’t have wanted to be on the exposed Knife Edge or other peaks that day. I looked around a bit then headed straight back down the Saddle Trail.
Steep, scary, and requiring getting very low and using my hands, I slowly went down the steep part, which included a huge swarm of black flies. Pretty funny actually as I couldn’t swat at them it was so steep. I got back to the snow slide area and I just bushwhacked it again then hit the trail. Eventually I got down far enough to trot back into Chimney Pond campground. About 50 minutes and only 1.9 miles. My NB 1010 shoes were super grippy and performed well with a light pack on. I ran into the campground ranger later and heard him telling campers that all trails up the mountain from Chimney Pond are closed. Oopsy.
Zoom Info
Katahdin
There are a few “must see” spots in Maine and Baxter State Park is definitely at the top of the list. Our weekend family trip was to overnight Friday at Roaring Brook, try to see some moose at nearby Sandy Stream Pond, then hike up to Chimney Pond and stay in the bunkhouse Saturday then hike out to Roaring Brook Sunday. Just a quick trip and a first for our kids.
The Park’s reservation system is now on a rolling 4 month system with online services now available (AMAZING, as it used to be snail mail only. Really). I made these reservations in February, and Chimney Pond just opened for summer overnight hikers the day we were there, June 1. 
I reserved the bunkhouse at Roaring Brook and Chimney Pond as I thought it may be cold and/or lots of black flies. Amazingly, it turned out steamy hot with a very healthy black fly population. 
Sandy Stream Pond did not disappoint. Many moose and our friends had a nice up close encounter with a cow and yearling. The kids swam in the pond with a grand view of the mountain behind them.
Saturday we hiked up to Chimney Pond, which is only 3.3 miles but feels about double that short mileage. Very rocky and steep in places. Katahdin miles are not normal hiking miles, they are LONG. We took our time and took a few water/food breaks. It took us 3 hours to hike from Roaring Brook to Chimney Pond.
The view up from Chimney Pond is amazing. With binoculars we could see hikers on the Knife Edge Trail between Chimney Peak and South Peak hunched over and getting on all fours at times. The wind was very strong at Chimney Pond, it must have been whipping furiously at the top of the mountain. Wanting to check out the wind gusts myself, I thought I’d run/hike up the Saddle Trail.
I put on my New Balance 1010 trail shoes and my Nathan running pack with food/water/jacket and trotted out of Chimney Pond and quickly it got way too steep to run. So power hiked it and ran where I could. I just couldn’t figure out why I wasn’t running into hikers coming down off the mountain making their loop back to Roaring Brook. Then I hit snow in a slide area. Snow carved out underneath by melt and rain flow. And no footprints. SO, maybe this trail is closed. It was a short section that I could skirt in some bushes, which I did, then the trail just went straight up. Like I hope to see-my-kids-again steep. I could see the top, maybe two tenths of a mile away so I just kept going knowing it was going to be scary descending. (And folks, the Saddle Trail is the “easy” way up from Chimney Pond to the top of the mountain. I remember it being much easier when I was 24 also.)
I got to the top and it was windy but not horrible. I did have a bit of tableland ahead of me so probably not full force, still I wouldn’t have wanted to be on the exposed Knife Edge or other peaks that day. I looked around a bit then headed straight back down the Saddle Trail.
Steep, scary, and requiring getting very low and using my hands, I slowly went down the steep part, which included a huge swarm of black flies. Pretty funny actually as I couldn’t swat at them it was so steep. I got back to the snow slide area and I just bushwhacked it again then hit the trail. Eventually I got down far enough to trot back into Chimney Pond campground. About 50 minutes and only 1.9 miles. My NB 1010 shoes were super grippy and performed well with a light pack on. I ran into the campground ranger later and heard him telling campers that all trails up the mountain from Chimney Pond are closed. Oopsy.
Zoom Info
Katahdin
There are a few “must see” spots in Maine and Baxter State Park is definitely at the top of the list. Our weekend family trip was to overnight Friday at Roaring Brook, try to see some moose at nearby Sandy Stream Pond, then hike up to Chimney Pond and stay in the bunkhouse Saturday then hike out to Roaring Brook Sunday. Just a quick trip and a first for our kids.
The Park’s reservation system is now on a rolling 4 month system with online services now available (AMAZING, as it used to be snail mail only. Really). I made these reservations in February, and Chimney Pond just opened for summer overnight hikers the day we were there, June 1. 
I reserved the bunkhouse at Roaring Brook and Chimney Pond as I thought it may be cold and/or lots of black flies. Amazingly, it turned out steamy hot with a very healthy black fly population. 
Sandy Stream Pond did not disappoint. Many moose and our friends had a nice up close encounter with a cow and yearling. The kids swam in the pond with a grand view of the mountain behind them.
Saturday we hiked up to Chimney Pond, which is only 3.3 miles but feels about double that short mileage. Very rocky and steep in places. Katahdin miles are not normal hiking miles, they are LONG. We took our time and took a few water/food breaks. It took us 3 hours to hike from Roaring Brook to Chimney Pond.
The view up from Chimney Pond is amazing. With binoculars we could see hikers on the Knife Edge Trail between Chimney Peak and South Peak hunched over and getting on all fours at times. The wind was very strong at Chimney Pond, it must have been whipping furiously at the top of the mountain. Wanting to check out the wind gusts myself, I thought I’d run/hike up the Saddle Trail.
I put on my New Balance 1010 trail shoes and my Nathan running pack with food/water/jacket and trotted out of Chimney Pond and quickly it got way too steep to run. So power hiked it and ran where I could. I just couldn’t figure out why I wasn’t running into hikers coming down off the mountain making their loop back to Roaring Brook. Then I hit snow in a slide area. Snow carved out underneath by melt and rain flow. And no footprints. SO, maybe this trail is closed. It was a short section that I could skirt in some bushes, which I did, then the trail just went straight up. Like I hope to see-my-kids-again steep. I could see the top, maybe two tenths of a mile away so I just kept going knowing it was going to be scary descending. (And folks, the Saddle Trail is the “easy” way up from Chimney Pond to the top of the mountain. I remember it being much easier when I was 24 also.)
I got to the top and it was windy but not horrible. I did have a bit of tableland ahead of me so probably not full force, still I wouldn’t have wanted to be on the exposed Knife Edge or other peaks that day. I looked around a bit then headed straight back down the Saddle Trail.
Steep, scary, and requiring getting very low and using my hands, I slowly went down the steep part, which included a huge swarm of black flies. Pretty funny actually as I couldn’t swat at them it was so steep. I got back to the snow slide area and I just bushwhacked it again then hit the trail. Eventually I got down far enough to trot back into Chimney Pond campground. About 50 minutes and only 1.9 miles. My NB 1010 shoes were super grippy and performed well with a light pack on. I ran into the campground ranger later and heard him telling campers that all trails up the mountain from Chimney Pond are closed. Oopsy.
Zoom Info
Katahdin
There are a few “must see” spots in Maine and Baxter State Park is definitely at the top of the list. Our weekend family trip was to overnight Friday at Roaring Brook, try to see some moose at nearby Sandy Stream Pond, then hike up to Chimney Pond and stay in the bunkhouse Saturday then hike out to Roaring Brook Sunday. Just a quick trip and a first for our kids.
The Park’s reservation system is now on a rolling 4 month system with online services now available (AMAZING, as it used to be snail mail only. Really). I made these reservations in February, and Chimney Pond just opened for summer overnight hikers the day we were there, June 1. 
I reserved the bunkhouse at Roaring Brook and Chimney Pond as I thought it may be cold and/or lots of black flies. Amazingly, it turned out steamy hot with a very healthy black fly population. 
Sandy Stream Pond did not disappoint. Many moose and our friends had a nice up close encounter with a cow and yearling. The kids swam in the pond with a grand view of the mountain behind them.
Saturday we hiked up to Chimney Pond, which is only 3.3 miles but feels about double that short mileage. Very rocky and steep in places. Katahdin miles are not normal hiking miles, they are LONG. We took our time and took a few water/food breaks. It took us 3 hours to hike from Roaring Brook to Chimney Pond.
The view up from Chimney Pond is amazing. With binoculars we could see hikers on the Knife Edge Trail between Chimney Peak and South Peak hunched over and getting on all fours at times. The wind was very strong at Chimney Pond, it must have been whipping furiously at the top of the mountain. Wanting to check out the wind gusts myself, I thought I’d run/hike up the Saddle Trail.
I put on my New Balance 1010 trail shoes and my Nathan running pack with food/water/jacket and trotted out of Chimney Pond and quickly it got way too steep to run. So power hiked it and ran where I could. I just couldn’t figure out why I wasn’t running into hikers coming down off the mountain making their loop back to Roaring Brook. Then I hit snow in a slide area. Snow carved out underneath by melt and rain flow. And no footprints. SO, maybe this trail is closed. It was a short section that I could skirt in some bushes, which I did, then the trail just went straight up. Like I hope to see-my-kids-again steep. I could see the top, maybe two tenths of a mile away so I just kept going knowing it was going to be scary descending. (And folks, the Saddle Trail is the “easy” way up from Chimney Pond to the top of the mountain. I remember it being much easier when I was 24 also.)
I got to the top and it was windy but not horrible. I did have a bit of tableland ahead of me so probably not full force, still I wouldn’t have wanted to be on the exposed Knife Edge or other peaks that day. I looked around a bit then headed straight back down the Saddle Trail.
Steep, scary, and requiring getting very low and using my hands, I slowly went down the steep part, which included a huge swarm of black flies. Pretty funny actually as I couldn’t swat at them it was so steep. I got back to the snow slide area and I just bushwhacked it again then hit the trail. Eventually I got down far enough to trot back into Chimney Pond campground. About 50 minutes and only 1.9 miles. My NB 1010 shoes were super grippy and performed well with a light pack on. I ran into the campground ranger later and heard him telling campers that all trails up the mountain from Chimney Pond are closed. Oopsy.
Zoom Info

Katahdin

There are a few “must see” spots in Maine and Baxter State Park is definitely at the top of the list. Our weekend family trip was to overnight Friday at Roaring Brook, try to see some moose at nearby Sandy Stream Pond, then hike up to Chimney Pond and stay in the bunkhouse Saturday then hike out to Roaring Brook Sunday. Just a quick trip and a first for our kids.

The Park’s reservation system is now on a rolling 4 month system with online services now available (AMAZING, as it used to be snail mail only. Really). I made these reservations in February, and Chimney Pond just opened for summer overnight hikers the day we were there, June 1. 

I reserved the bunkhouse at Roaring Brook and Chimney Pond as I thought it may be cold and/or lots of black flies. Amazingly, it turned out steamy hot with a very healthy black fly population. 

Sandy Stream Pond did not disappoint. Many moose and our friends had a nice up close encounter with a cow and yearling. The kids swam in the pond with a grand view of the mountain behind them.

Saturday we hiked up to Chimney Pond, which is only 3.3 miles but feels about double that short mileage. Very rocky and steep in places. Katahdin miles are not normal hiking miles, they are LONG. We took our time and took a few water/food breaks. It took us 3 hours to hike from Roaring Brook to Chimney Pond.

The view up from Chimney Pond is amazing. With binoculars we could see hikers on the Knife Edge Trail between Chimney Peak and South Peak hunched over and getting on all fours at times. The wind was very strong at Chimney Pond, it must have been whipping furiously at the top of the mountain. Wanting to check out the wind gusts myself, I thought I’d run/hike up the Saddle Trail.

I put on my New Balance 1010 trail shoes and my Nathan running pack with food/water/jacket and trotted out of Chimney Pond and quickly it got way too steep to run. So power hiked it and ran where I could. I just couldn’t figure out why I wasn’t running into hikers coming down off the mountain making their loop back to Roaring Brook. Then I hit snow in a slide area. Snow carved out underneath by melt and rain flow. And no footprints. SO, maybe this trail is closed. It was a short section that I could skirt in some bushes, which I did, then the trail just went straight up. Like I hope to see-my-kids-again steep. I could see the top, maybe two tenths of a mile away so I just kept going knowing it was going to be scary descending. (And folks, the Saddle Trail is the “easy” way up from Chimney Pond to the top of the mountain. I remember it being much easier when I was 24 also.)

I got to the top and it was windy but not horrible. I did have a bit of tableland ahead of me so probably not full force, still I wouldn’t have wanted to be on the exposed Knife Edge or other peaks that day. I looked around a bit then headed straight back down the Saddle Trail.

Steep, scary, and requiring getting very low and using my hands, I slowly went down the steep part, which included a huge swarm of black flies. Pretty funny actually as I couldn’t swat at them it was so steep. I got back to the snow slide area and I just bushwhacked it again then hit the trail. Eventually I got down far enough to trot back into Chimney Pond campground. About 50 minutes and only 1.9 miles. My NB 1010 shoes were super grippy and performed well with a light pack on. I ran into the campground ranger later and heard him telling campers that all trails up the mountain from Chimney Pond are closed. Oopsy.

Acadia Again
I again headed downeast since this is the last weekend before the Loop Road opens on May 17. This time with Tracey and Pat. Let’s just say they’re athletes that have a lot of experience in adventure racing. Foul weather, extreme terrain, & pushing hard running/cycling is no prob for these two. So it was game on with the forecast 50°, windy, and rain.
We parked at The Tarn (small glacial pond) and planned to bike the Ocean Drive section of the Loop Road then return to the car, change and run up Cadillac via the Ladder Trail over Dorr Mountain. 
The rain started hard once we parked at The Tarn parking area. Soaked within five minutes, I was cheering the uphills so I could warm up and pump some blood into my very cold fingers. (50°, wet, and with the wind chill of road riding I get very cold hands.) We glimpsed Sand Beach, beautiful as ever, and the rocky coast was still stunning in the rainy mist. We rode past Blackwoods Campground just off the Loop Road and climbed up the overpass bank to Route 3 then rode back to the car. (And it stopped raining.) A short ride of only 13 miles but my hands were just not functioning well by the end they were so cold. 
We dried off and changed for running. I jumped out of the van, turned to grab my pack (with the car key in it) but assuming I had everything Pat and Tracey, simultaneously, slammed the doors shut as I reached for my pack. Bye bye pack and key locked in the car. Oopsie! Ok let’s run to Bar Harbor or, as it worked out, just Jackson Lab 1/2 mile down the road. The very friendly and helpful security guards let us in to use the phone and within an hour AAA tow truck dude popped the lock in 10 seconds flat. Ok back in business.
Cadillac is deceptively close if you look at the map. Just two miles from The Tarn but pretty much straight up hill. The Ladder Trail is a stairmaster from hell initially, then a short section of iron rungs and bars, then just steep ledge. The view is amazing on a clear day but we were cloud swept most of the way. So we ran/hiked up and over Dorr Mountain then up Cadillac. Cadillac was socked in and crazy windy. We decided to add a little mileage (and not descend iron rungs) so took a trail south that looped back to The Tarn. Really great time to explore and the weather added a nice crazy twist to the whole day. 
Of course, Finelli’s pizza in Ellsworth on the way home. So, so good.
Zoom Info
Acadia Again
I again headed downeast since this is the last weekend before the Loop Road opens on May 17. This time with Tracey and Pat. Let’s just say they’re athletes that have a lot of experience in adventure racing. Foul weather, extreme terrain, & pushing hard running/cycling is no prob for these two. So it was game on with the forecast 50°, windy, and rain.
We parked at The Tarn (small glacial pond) and planned to bike the Ocean Drive section of the Loop Road then return to the car, change and run up Cadillac via the Ladder Trail over Dorr Mountain. 
The rain started hard once we parked at The Tarn parking area. Soaked within five minutes, I was cheering the uphills so I could warm up and pump some blood into my very cold fingers. (50°, wet, and with the wind chill of road riding I get very cold hands.) We glimpsed Sand Beach, beautiful as ever, and the rocky coast was still stunning in the rainy mist. We rode past Blackwoods Campground just off the Loop Road and climbed up the overpass bank to Route 3 then rode back to the car. (And it stopped raining.) A short ride of only 13 miles but my hands were just not functioning well by the end they were so cold. 
We dried off and changed for running. I jumped out of the van, turned to grab my pack (with the car key in it) but assuming I had everything Pat and Tracey, simultaneously, slammed the doors shut as I reached for my pack. Bye bye pack and key locked in the car. Oopsie! Ok let’s run to Bar Harbor or, as it worked out, just Jackson Lab 1/2 mile down the road. The very friendly and helpful security guards let us in to use the phone and within an hour AAA tow truck dude popped the lock in 10 seconds flat. Ok back in business.
Cadillac is deceptively close if you look at the map. Just two miles from The Tarn but pretty much straight up hill. The Ladder Trail is a stairmaster from hell initially, then a short section of iron rungs and bars, then just steep ledge. The view is amazing on a clear day but we were cloud swept most of the way. So we ran/hiked up and over Dorr Mountain then up Cadillac. Cadillac was socked in and crazy windy. We decided to add a little mileage (and not descend iron rungs) so took a trail south that looped back to The Tarn. Really great time to explore and the weather added a nice crazy twist to the whole day. 
Of course, Finelli’s pizza in Ellsworth on the way home. So, so good.
Zoom Info
Acadia Again
I again headed downeast since this is the last weekend before the Loop Road opens on May 17. This time with Tracey and Pat. Let’s just say they’re athletes that have a lot of experience in adventure racing. Foul weather, extreme terrain, & pushing hard running/cycling is no prob for these two. So it was game on with the forecast 50°, windy, and rain.
We parked at The Tarn (small glacial pond) and planned to bike the Ocean Drive section of the Loop Road then return to the car, change and run up Cadillac via the Ladder Trail over Dorr Mountain. 
The rain started hard once we parked at The Tarn parking area. Soaked within five minutes, I was cheering the uphills so I could warm up and pump some blood into my very cold fingers. (50°, wet, and with the wind chill of road riding I get very cold hands.) We glimpsed Sand Beach, beautiful as ever, and the rocky coast was still stunning in the rainy mist. We rode past Blackwoods Campground just off the Loop Road and climbed up the overpass bank to Route 3 then rode back to the car. (And it stopped raining.) A short ride of only 13 miles but my hands were just not functioning well by the end they were so cold. 
We dried off and changed for running. I jumped out of the van, turned to grab my pack (with the car key in it) but assuming I had everything Pat and Tracey, simultaneously, slammed the doors shut as I reached for my pack. Bye bye pack and key locked in the car. Oopsie! Ok let’s run to Bar Harbor or, as it worked out, just Jackson Lab 1/2 mile down the road. The very friendly and helpful security guards let us in to use the phone and within an hour AAA tow truck dude popped the lock in 10 seconds flat. Ok back in business.
Cadillac is deceptively close if you look at the map. Just two miles from The Tarn but pretty much straight up hill. The Ladder Trail is a stairmaster from hell initially, then a short section of iron rungs and bars, then just steep ledge. The view is amazing on a clear day but we were cloud swept most of the way. So we ran/hiked up and over Dorr Mountain then up Cadillac. Cadillac was socked in and crazy windy. We decided to add a little mileage (and not descend iron rungs) so took a trail south that looped back to The Tarn. Really great time to explore and the weather added a nice crazy twist to the whole day. 
Of course, Finelli’s pizza in Ellsworth on the way home. So, so good.
Zoom Info
Acadia Again
I again headed downeast since this is the last weekend before the Loop Road opens on May 17. This time with Tracey and Pat. Let’s just say they’re athletes that have a lot of experience in adventure racing. Foul weather, extreme terrain, & pushing hard running/cycling is no prob for these two. So it was game on with the forecast 50°, windy, and rain.
We parked at The Tarn (small glacial pond) and planned to bike the Ocean Drive section of the Loop Road then return to the car, change and run up Cadillac via the Ladder Trail over Dorr Mountain. 
The rain started hard once we parked at The Tarn parking area. Soaked within five minutes, I was cheering the uphills so I could warm up and pump some blood into my very cold fingers. (50°, wet, and with the wind chill of road riding I get very cold hands.) We glimpsed Sand Beach, beautiful as ever, and the rocky coast was still stunning in the rainy mist. We rode past Blackwoods Campground just off the Loop Road and climbed up the overpass bank to Route 3 then rode back to the car. (And it stopped raining.) A short ride of only 13 miles but my hands were just not functioning well by the end they were so cold. 
We dried off and changed for running. I jumped out of the van, turned to grab my pack (with the car key in it) but assuming I had everything Pat and Tracey, simultaneously, slammed the doors shut as I reached for my pack. Bye bye pack and key locked in the car. Oopsie! Ok let’s run to Bar Harbor or, as it worked out, just Jackson Lab 1/2 mile down the road. The very friendly and helpful security guards let us in to use the phone and within an hour AAA tow truck dude popped the lock in 10 seconds flat. Ok back in business.
Cadillac is deceptively close if you look at the map. Just two miles from The Tarn but pretty much straight up hill. The Ladder Trail is a stairmaster from hell initially, then a short section of iron rungs and bars, then just steep ledge. The view is amazing on a clear day but we were cloud swept most of the way. So we ran/hiked up and over Dorr Mountain then up Cadillac. Cadillac was socked in and crazy windy. We decided to add a little mileage (and not descend iron rungs) so took a trail south that looped back to The Tarn. Really great time to explore and the weather added a nice crazy twist to the whole day. 
Of course, Finelli’s pizza in Ellsworth on the way home. So, so good.
Zoom Info
Acadia Again
I again headed downeast since this is the last weekend before the Loop Road opens on May 17. This time with Tracey and Pat. Let’s just say they’re athletes that have a lot of experience in adventure racing. Foul weather, extreme terrain, & pushing hard running/cycling is no prob for these two. So it was game on with the forecast 50°, windy, and rain.
We parked at The Tarn (small glacial pond) and planned to bike the Ocean Drive section of the Loop Road then return to the car, change and run up Cadillac via the Ladder Trail over Dorr Mountain. 
The rain started hard once we parked at The Tarn parking area. Soaked within five minutes, I was cheering the uphills so I could warm up and pump some blood into my very cold fingers. (50°, wet, and with the wind chill of road riding I get very cold hands.) We glimpsed Sand Beach, beautiful as ever, and the rocky coast was still stunning in the rainy mist. We rode past Blackwoods Campground just off the Loop Road and climbed up the overpass bank to Route 3 then rode back to the car. (And it stopped raining.) A short ride of only 13 miles but my hands were just not functioning well by the end they were so cold. 
We dried off and changed for running. I jumped out of the van, turned to grab my pack (with the car key in it) but assuming I had everything Pat and Tracey, simultaneously, slammed the doors shut as I reached for my pack. Bye bye pack and key locked in the car. Oopsie! Ok let’s run to Bar Harbor or, as it worked out, just Jackson Lab 1/2 mile down the road. The very friendly and helpful security guards let us in to use the phone and within an hour AAA tow truck dude popped the lock in 10 seconds flat. Ok back in business.
Cadillac is deceptively close if you look at the map. Just two miles from The Tarn but pretty much straight up hill. The Ladder Trail is a stairmaster from hell initially, then a short section of iron rungs and bars, then just steep ledge. The view is amazing on a clear day but we were cloud swept most of the way. So we ran/hiked up and over Dorr Mountain then up Cadillac. Cadillac was socked in and crazy windy. We decided to add a little mileage (and not descend iron rungs) so took a trail south that looped back to The Tarn. Really great time to explore and the weather added a nice crazy twist to the whole day. 
Of course, Finelli’s pizza in Ellsworth on the way home. So, so good.
Zoom Info
Acadia Again
I again headed downeast since this is the last weekend before the Loop Road opens on May 17. This time with Tracey and Pat. Let’s just say they’re athletes that have a lot of experience in adventure racing. Foul weather, extreme terrain, & pushing hard running/cycling is no prob for these two. So it was game on with the forecast 50°, windy, and rain.
We parked at The Tarn (small glacial pond) and planned to bike the Ocean Drive section of the Loop Road then return to the car, change and run up Cadillac via the Ladder Trail over Dorr Mountain. 
The rain started hard once we parked at The Tarn parking area. Soaked within five minutes, I was cheering the uphills so I could warm up and pump some blood into my very cold fingers. (50°, wet, and with the wind chill of road riding I get very cold hands.) We glimpsed Sand Beach, beautiful as ever, and the rocky coast was still stunning in the rainy mist. We rode past Blackwoods Campground just off the Loop Road and climbed up the overpass bank to Route 3 then rode back to the car. (And it stopped raining.) A short ride of only 13 miles but my hands were just not functioning well by the end they were so cold. 
We dried off and changed for running. I jumped out of the van, turned to grab my pack (with the car key in it) but assuming I had everything Pat and Tracey, simultaneously, slammed the doors shut as I reached for my pack. Bye bye pack and key locked in the car. Oopsie! Ok let’s run to Bar Harbor or, as it worked out, just Jackson Lab 1/2 mile down the road. The very friendly and helpful security guards let us in to use the phone and within an hour AAA tow truck dude popped the lock in 10 seconds flat. Ok back in business.
Cadillac is deceptively close if you look at the map. Just two miles from The Tarn but pretty much straight up hill. The Ladder Trail is a stairmaster from hell initially, then a short section of iron rungs and bars, then just steep ledge. The view is amazing on a clear day but we were cloud swept most of the way. So we ran/hiked up and over Dorr Mountain then up Cadillac. Cadillac was socked in and crazy windy. We decided to add a little mileage (and not descend iron rungs) so took a trail south that looped back to The Tarn. Really great time to explore and the weather added a nice crazy twist to the whole day. 
Of course, Finelli’s pizza in Ellsworth on the way home. So, so good.
Zoom Info
Acadia Again
I again headed downeast since this is the last weekend before the Loop Road opens on May 17. This time with Tracey and Pat. Let’s just say they’re athletes that have a lot of experience in adventure racing. Foul weather, extreme terrain, & pushing hard running/cycling is no prob for these two. So it was game on with the forecast 50°, windy, and rain.
We parked at The Tarn (small glacial pond) and planned to bike the Ocean Drive section of the Loop Road then return to the car, change and run up Cadillac via the Ladder Trail over Dorr Mountain. 
The rain started hard once we parked at The Tarn parking area. Soaked within five minutes, I was cheering the uphills so I could warm up and pump some blood into my very cold fingers. (50°, wet, and with the wind chill of road riding I get very cold hands.) We glimpsed Sand Beach, beautiful as ever, and the rocky coast was still stunning in the rainy mist. We rode past Blackwoods Campground just off the Loop Road and climbed up the overpass bank to Route 3 then rode back to the car. (And it stopped raining.) A short ride of only 13 miles but my hands were just not functioning well by the end they were so cold. 
We dried off and changed for running. I jumped out of the van, turned to grab my pack (with the car key in it) but assuming I had everything Pat and Tracey, simultaneously, slammed the doors shut as I reached for my pack. Bye bye pack and key locked in the car. Oopsie! Ok let’s run to Bar Harbor or, as it worked out, just Jackson Lab 1/2 mile down the road. The very friendly and helpful security guards let us in to use the phone and within an hour AAA tow truck dude popped the lock in 10 seconds flat. Ok back in business.
Cadillac is deceptively close if you look at the map. Just two miles from The Tarn but pretty much straight up hill. The Ladder Trail is a stairmaster from hell initially, then a short section of iron rungs and bars, then just steep ledge. The view is amazing on a clear day but we were cloud swept most of the way. So we ran/hiked up and over Dorr Mountain then up Cadillac. Cadillac was socked in and crazy windy. We decided to add a little mileage (and not descend iron rungs) so took a trail south that looped back to The Tarn. Really great time to explore and the weather added a nice crazy twist to the whole day. 
Of course, Finelli’s pizza in Ellsworth on the way home. So, so good.
Zoom Info
Acadia Again
I again headed downeast since this is the last weekend before the Loop Road opens on May 17. This time with Tracey and Pat. Let’s just say they’re athletes that have a lot of experience in adventure racing. Foul weather, extreme terrain, & pushing hard running/cycling is no prob for these two. So it was game on with the forecast 50°, windy, and rain.
We parked at The Tarn (small glacial pond) and planned to bike the Ocean Drive section of the Loop Road then return to the car, change and run up Cadillac via the Ladder Trail over Dorr Mountain. 
The rain started hard once we parked at The Tarn parking area. Soaked within five minutes, I was cheering the uphills so I could warm up and pump some blood into my very cold fingers. (50°, wet, and with the wind chill of road riding I get very cold hands.) We glimpsed Sand Beach, beautiful as ever, and the rocky coast was still stunning in the rainy mist. We rode past Blackwoods Campground just off the Loop Road and climbed up the overpass bank to Route 3 then rode back to the car. (And it stopped raining.) A short ride of only 13 miles but my hands were just not functioning well by the end they were so cold. 
We dried off and changed for running. I jumped out of the van, turned to grab my pack (with the car key in it) but assuming I had everything Pat and Tracey, simultaneously, slammed the doors shut as I reached for my pack. Bye bye pack and key locked in the car. Oopsie! Ok let’s run to Bar Harbor or, as it worked out, just Jackson Lab 1/2 mile down the road. The very friendly and helpful security guards let us in to use the phone and within an hour AAA tow truck dude popped the lock in 10 seconds flat. Ok back in business.
Cadillac is deceptively close if you look at the map. Just two miles from The Tarn but pretty much straight up hill. The Ladder Trail is a stairmaster from hell initially, then a short section of iron rungs and bars, then just steep ledge. The view is amazing on a clear day but we were cloud swept most of the way. So we ran/hiked up and over Dorr Mountain then up Cadillac. Cadillac was socked in and crazy windy. We decided to add a little mileage (and not descend iron rungs) so took a trail south that looped back to The Tarn. Really great time to explore and the weather added a nice crazy twist to the whole day. 
Of course, Finelli’s pizza in Ellsworth on the way home. So, so good.
Zoom Info
Acadia Again
I again headed downeast since this is the last weekend before the Loop Road opens on May 17. This time with Tracey and Pat. Let’s just say they’re athletes that have a lot of experience in adventure racing. Foul weather, extreme terrain, & pushing hard running/cycling is no prob for these two. So it was game on with the forecast 50°, windy, and rain.
We parked at The Tarn (small glacial pond) and planned to bike the Ocean Drive section of the Loop Road then return to the car, change and run up Cadillac via the Ladder Trail over Dorr Mountain. 
The rain started hard once we parked at The Tarn parking area. Soaked within five minutes, I was cheering the uphills so I could warm up and pump some blood into my very cold fingers. (50°, wet, and with the wind chill of road riding I get very cold hands.) We glimpsed Sand Beach, beautiful as ever, and the rocky coast was still stunning in the rainy mist. We rode past Blackwoods Campground just off the Loop Road and climbed up the overpass bank to Route 3 then rode back to the car. (And it stopped raining.) A short ride of only 13 miles but my hands were just not functioning well by the end they were so cold. 
We dried off and changed for running. I jumped out of the van, turned to grab my pack (with the car key in it) but assuming I had everything Pat and Tracey, simultaneously, slammed the doors shut as I reached for my pack. Bye bye pack and key locked in the car. Oopsie! Ok let’s run to Bar Harbor or, as it worked out, just Jackson Lab 1/2 mile down the road. The very friendly and helpful security guards let us in to use the phone and within an hour AAA tow truck dude popped the lock in 10 seconds flat. Ok back in business.
Cadillac is deceptively close if you look at the map. Just two miles from The Tarn but pretty much straight up hill. The Ladder Trail is a stairmaster from hell initially, then a short section of iron rungs and bars, then just steep ledge. The view is amazing on a clear day but we were cloud swept most of the way. So we ran/hiked up and over Dorr Mountain then up Cadillac. Cadillac was socked in and crazy windy. We decided to add a little mileage (and not descend iron rungs) so took a trail south that looped back to The Tarn. Really great time to explore and the weather added a nice crazy twist to the whole day. 
Of course, Finelli’s pizza in Ellsworth on the way home. So, so good.
Zoom Info

Acadia Again

I again headed downeast since this is the last weekend before the Loop Road opens on May 17. This time with Tracey and Pat. Let’s just say they’re athletes that have a lot of experience in adventure racing. Foul weather, extreme terrain, & pushing hard running/cycling is no prob for these two. So it was game on with the forecast 50°, windy, and rain.

We parked at The Tarn (small glacial pond) and planned to bike the Ocean Drive section of the Loop Road then return to the car, change and run up Cadillac via the Ladder Trail over Dorr Mountain. 

The rain started hard once we parked at The Tarn parking area. Soaked within five minutes, I was cheering the uphills so I could warm up and pump some blood into my very cold fingers. (50°, wet, and with the wind chill of road riding I get very cold hands.) We glimpsed Sand Beach, beautiful as ever, and the rocky coast was still stunning in the rainy mist. We rode past Blackwoods Campground just off the Loop Road and climbed up the overpass bank to Route 3 then rode back to the car. (And it stopped raining.) A short ride of only 13 miles but my hands were just not functioning well by the end they were so cold. 

We dried off and changed for running. I jumped out of the van, turned to grab my pack (with the car key in it) but assuming I had everything Pat and Tracey, simultaneously, slammed the doors shut as I reached for my pack. Bye bye pack and key locked in the car. Oopsie! Ok let’s run to Bar Harbor or, as it worked out, just Jackson Lab 1/2 mile down the road. The very friendly and helpful security guards let us in to use the phone and within an hour AAA tow truck dude popped the lock in 10 seconds flat. Ok back in business.

Cadillac is deceptively close if you look at the map. Just two miles from The Tarn but pretty much straight up hill. The Ladder Trail is a stairmaster from hell initially, then a short section of iron rungs and bars, then just steep ledge. The view is amazing on a clear day but we were cloud swept most of the way. So we ran/hiked up and over Dorr Mountain then up Cadillac. Cadillac was socked in and crazy windy. We decided to add a little mileage (and not descend iron rungs) so took a trail south that looped back to The Tarn. Really great time to explore and the weather added a nice crazy twist to the whole day. 

Of course, Finelli’s pizza in Ellsworth on the way home. So, so good.

This was yesterday. Patriot’s Day. Boston Marathon Day. I was biking with my buddy Tracey. (She ran Boston last year in the heat…and finished.) We stopped to check the women’s elite results and continued to check the progress of a friend.
Then bombs and unfolding news swirled around my short run with my 7 year old later that day. At an event focused around what I have come to love: Running. Families, children watching loved ones finish a physical quest to only be physically destroyed. Absolutely horrible. 
Boston is my “big” city. The Boston Public Library was a sort of hub from where we explored. My father was Maine State Librarian for years and we accompanied him on many trips that centered around the library and nearby sites. I was a total country mouse and Boston gave me confidence about cities. It’s history is rich and deep and I am not sure you can understand the United States without knowing Boston & it’s environ’s history. So, again, a feeling of place is lost.
Zoom Info
Camera
iPhone 5
ISO
50
Aperture
f/2.4
Exposure
1/1938th
Focal Length
4mm

This was yesterday. Patriot’s Day. Boston Marathon Day. I was biking with my buddy Tracey. (She ran Boston last year in the heat…and finished.) We stopped to check the women’s elite results and continued to check the progress of a friend.

Then bombs and unfolding news swirled around my short run with my 7 year old later that day. At an event focused around what I have come to love: Running. Families, children watching loved ones finish a physical quest to only be physically destroyed. Absolutely horrible. 

Boston is my “big” city. The Boston Public Library was a sort of hub from where we explored. My father was Maine State Librarian for years and we accompanied him on many trips that centered around the library and nearby sites. I was a total country mouse and Boston gave me confidence about cities. It’s history is rich and deep and I am not sure you can understand the United States without knowing Boston & it’s environ’s history. So, again, a feeling of place is lost.

emilyqualey:

Here’s a neat 39-minute history of Rockport (and Camden, kinda), Maine. It’s good to be reminded that this neck of the woods was highly industrial back in the day, producing ice and lime and building ships that were transported and sailed all over the world. There are great interviews with a handful of midcoast elders and a fun segment on Andre the seal. 

The Camdenite/Rockporter rivalry that caused the two towns to split is pretty funny to think about in the context of today. Apparently rocks would be thrown at the town line with jeers of:

Camden bums live on rum, 
Rockport paddywackers live on soda crackers.

Here’s to history!

Trail Running in the FL
I knew I’d be able to eek out some trail runs on vacation in Florida. The only sketch factor was the exotic bug/animal factor. Coming from up north it always seems more scary than the rare reality of encountering a water moccasin or feral pig (wha?). Florida can be a hot, humid, altered reality that freaks me out then I go to a preserve or state park &, bam, awesome. (FL has 10% of the lower-48 wetlands, wetlands cover ~30% of FL. I love wetland flora & fauna!)

Estero Bay Preserve is ~3.5 miles from my Mom’s & the map showed a few miles of trails so I could get away from the concrete sidewalks for awhile. The trails ended up being overgrown, flooded in places, & muddy. Also lots of churned ground from the feral pigs. The flooded areas were a little freaky due to gators but I just kept an eye out and sallied forth. I forgot all about the snake factor & didn’t see any. So a perfect adventure from water to mud to hard pan sand flats with the super bonus of running in just shorts & a t-shirt instead of my 5° layered runs back home. Fun!
Zoom Info
Trail Running in the FL
I knew I’d be able to eek out some trail runs on vacation in Florida. The only sketch factor was the exotic bug/animal factor. Coming from up north it always seems more scary than the rare reality of encountering a water moccasin or feral pig (wha?). Florida can be a hot, humid, altered reality that freaks me out then I go to a preserve or state park &, bam, awesome. (FL has 10% of the lower-48 wetlands, wetlands cover ~30% of FL. I love wetland flora & fauna!)

Estero Bay Preserve is ~3.5 miles from my Mom’s & the map showed a few miles of trails so I could get away from the concrete sidewalks for awhile. The trails ended up being overgrown, flooded in places, & muddy. Also lots of churned ground from the feral pigs. The flooded areas were a little freaky due to gators but I just kept an eye out and sallied forth. I forgot all about the snake factor & didn’t see any. So a perfect adventure from water to mud to hard pan sand flats with the super bonus of running in just shorts & a t-shirt instead of my 5° layered runs back home. Fun!
Zoom Info
Trail Running in the FL
I knew I’d be able to eek out some trail runs on vacation in Florida. The only sketch factor was the exotic bug/animal factor. Coming from up north it always seems more scary than the rare reality of encountering a water moccasin or feral pig (wha?). Florida can be a hot, humid, altered reality that freaks me out then I go to a preserve or state park &, bam, awesome. (FL has 10% of the lower-48 wetlands, wetlands cover ~30% of FL. I love wetland flora & fauna!)

Estero Bay Preserve is ~3.5 miles from my Mom’s & the map showed a few miles of trails so I could get away from the concrete sidewalks for awhile. The trails ended up being overgrown, flooded in places, & muddy. Also lots of churned ground from the feral pigs. The flooded areas were a little freaky due to gators but I just kept an eye out and sallied forth. I forgot all about the snake factor & didn’t see any. So a perfect adventure from water to mud to hard pan sand flats with the super bonus of running in just shorts & a t-shirt instead of my 5° layered runs back home. Fun!
Zoom Info
Trail Running in the FL
I knew I’d be able to eek out some trail runs on vacation in Florida. The only sketch factor was the exotic bug/animal factor. Coming from up north it always seems more scary than the rare reality of encountering a water moccasin or feral pig (wha?). Florida can be a hot, humid, altered reality that freaks me out then I go to a preserve or state park &, bam, awesome. (FL has 10% of the lower-48 wetlands, wetlands cover ~30% of FL. I love wetland flora & fauna!)

Estero Bay Preserve is ~3.5 miles from my Mom’s & the map showed a few miles of trails so I could get away from the concrete sidewalks for awhile. The trails ended up being overgrown, flooded in places, & muddy. Also lots of churned ground from the feral pigs. The flooded areas were a little freaky due to gators but I just kept an eye out and sallied forth. I forgot all about the snake factor & didn’t see any. So a perfect adventure from water to mud to hard pan sand flats with the super bonus of running in just shorts & a t-shirt instead of my 5° layered runs back home. Fun!
Zoom Info
Trail Running in the FL
I knew I’d be able to eek out some trail runs on vacation in Florida. The only sketch factor was the exotic bug/animal factor. Coming from up north it always seems more scary than the rare reality of encountering a water moccasin or feral pig (wha?). Florida can be a hot, humid, altered reality that freaks me out then I go to a preserve or state park &, bam, awesome. (FL has 10% of the lower-48 wetlands, wetlands cover ~30% of FL. I love wetland flora & fauna!)

Estero Bay Preserve is ~3.5 miles from my Mom’s & the map showed a few miles of trails so I could get away from the concrete sidewalks for awhile. The trails ended up being overgrown, flooded in places, & muddy. Also lots of churned ground from the feral pigs. The flooded areas were a little freaky due to gators but I just kept an eye out and sallied forth. I forgot all about the snake factor & didn’t see any. So a perfect adventure from water to mud to hard pan sand flats with the super bonus of running in just shorts & a t-shirt instead of my 5° layered runs back home. Fun!
Zoom Info

Trail Running in the FL

I knew I’d be able to eek out some trail runs on vacation in Florida. The only sketch factor was the exotic bug/animal factor. Coming from up north it always seems more scary than the rare reality of encountering a water moccasin or feral pig (wha?). Florida can be a hot, humid, altered reality that freaks me out then I go to a preserve or state park &, bam, awesome. (FL has 10% of the lower-48 wetlands, wetlands cover ~30% of FL. I love wetland flora & fauna!)

Estero Bay Preserve is ~3.5 miles from my Mom’s & the map showed a few miles of trails so I could get away from the concrete sidewalks for awhile. The trails ended up being overgrown, flooded in places, & muddy. Also lots of churned ground from the feral pigs. The flooded areas were a little freaky due to gators but I just kept an eye out and sallied forth. I forgot all about the snake factor & didn’t see any. So a perfect adventure from water to mud to hard pan sand flats with the super bonus of running in just shorts & a t-shirt instead of my 5° layered runs back home. Fun!

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